Off the Beaten Track: The Zoological Museum of St. Petersburg. Russia

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7-8 month Mummy of the Magadan Baby Mammoth Dima”.

 

Prehistoric animals excite our imagination. A special exhibit of “Dinosaurs among Us” opened March 19th at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. In October, 2016, I had the unique opportunity of seeing the best collection of prehistoric mammoths in the world. I traveled to the Zoological Museum of St. Petersburg, in a tour arranged by expresstorussia.com and intourist.com. Regardless, travel helps us understand international persons, leading to peace.

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Zoological Museum of St. Petersburg, Russia

We began an adventure of walking unescorted to the Zoological Museum of St. Petersburg from our Domina Prestige hotel. One person walked fast, and lost me. She had no money. A college student gave her rubles to go into the museum. I gave up walking and returned to Domina Prestige. They secured a taxi for a round trip back to the hotel. The staff was my family away from home. The rest of our excursion was very enjoyable.

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First complete skeleton of a mammoth

The museum contains more than 1.5 million specimens. It is one of the largest of its kind. The prehistoric mammoth collection is renowned. Many come from Siberia. Russia has the prehistoric treasures of Siberia that few of us will ever see in the West. An unusual 7-8 month baby mammoth was discovered in June 1977 at the Kolyma River in northeastern Siberia. The exhausted mammoth fell into a pit filled with water and drowned. It had preserved internal organs. It dates back to 39-40 thousand years ago. It is known as the “Mummy of the Magadan Baby Mammoth Dima”.

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Adult mammoth skeleton was discovered in 1948 on the Taimyr Peninsula in North Central Siberia. Age finds, according to radiocarbon analysis, it is 11.5 thousand years.

The first complete skeleton of a mammoth was discovered in 1799 at the Bykovsky peninsula in northern Siberia. The absolute age is approximately 36 thousand years. An Adult mammoth skeleton was discovered in 1948 on the Taimyr Peninsula in North Central Siberia. Age finds, according to radiocarbon analysis, it is 11.5 thousand years. A fragment of skull and femur bones were displayed. They were found in 1943 in Southwest Turkmenistan, from the end of the early Late Pleistocene (2,588,000 to 11,700 years ago). It had a notable large size (height 4-4.5 m), a relatively short body and long, almost straight tusks.

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Photo 5 – fragment of skull and femur bones

In September 1988, on the banks of the river Yuribeteyaha, a tributary of the Oka Bay, the sailors of the ship “Threshold” found a female mammoth carcass, age 2-3 months. All summer it lay on shore, with no trunk, tail, left ear and torn skin. The absolute age of discovery is about 39 thousand years.

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Female mammoth carcass, age 2-3 months

We left Russia with a deep respect for the average person: they helped us when lost; gave a hand to me, a senior citizen so I could climb off a railroad platform with a large gap and helped me understand their great love for the Orthodox Church, Ancient Greek and Greek Byzantine civilization centered at Constantinople (modern Istanbul, Turkey). The Western press paints a negative photo of the Russian people. They are afraid of Terrorism, with their President protecting them and refusing to open borders. They have a deep love for the Asian nations who are bolstering their economy with trade revenues and travel. Does this sound familiar to Americans?

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Overview of mammoth exhibits.

Links

https://photos.google.com/album/AF1QipPwZfDqHQ6dh2EQvftnWVMQGgkIH1CKZqj8w6DC – album

 

 

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